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Investigation of tip-driven thruster and waterjet propulsion systems

Investigation of tip-driven thruster and waterjet propulsion systems
Investigation of tip-driven thruster and waterjet propulsion systems

Experimental and computational techniques have been used to study the performance of a tip-driven propeller (TDP) and a waterjet intake duct for the purpose of assessing the practical implications of using a tip-driven impeller in a waterjet propulsion system. A prototype electromagnetic tip-driven propeller has been successfully designed and built for the specific purpose of experimental analysis. This unit has been tested in towing tanks for a range of propeller speeds, advance speeds and duct shapes. In conjunction with the towing tank tests a potential-flow panel model (with viscous coupled duct) has been developed in order to predict the likely performance of the prototype thruster. The model has been validated against both the towing tank results, and against published data for standard ducted propeller units.

A representative waterjet intake duct has been tested using an open-circuit wind tunnel. Velocity proffles and surface pressure distributions have been obtained for three different flow regimes. In addition, a CFD model of the same inlet duct geometry has been developed using a fully viscous, commercial RANS flow solver. This model is validated against the wind tunnel test data and has been further developed to study the influence of trim and drift on the flow through the duct. In addition, a brief study on duct-hull interaction is presented.

Results from the experimental and computational tests on both the tip-driven propeller and waterjet intake duct are presented. The two validated CFD models are subsequently coupled together to investigate the performance implications of using a tip-driven, rather than shaft-driven, axial-flow waterjet impeller. It is shown that the use of a tip-driven impeller in a waterjet propulsion system has the potential to increase hydrodynamic performance. Removing the drive shaft from the system resulted in an increase in predicted impeller thrust of approximately KT=0.1. Finally, the practical implications of such a drive mechanism are discussed. It is seen that the use of an electromagnetic tip-drive is limited by the physical size of the motor.

University of Southampton
Hughes, Adam William
Hughes, Adam William

Hughes, Adam William (2000) Investigation of tip-driven thruster and waterjet propulsion systems. University of Southampton, Doctoral Thesis.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

Experimental and computational techniques have been used to study the performance of a tip-driven propeller (TDP) and a waterjet intake duct for the purpose of assessing the practical implications of using a tip-driven impeller in a waterjet propulsion system. A prototype electromagnetic tip-driven propeller has been successfully designed and built for the specific purpose of experimental analysis. This unit has been tested in towing tanks for a range of propeller speeds, advance speeds and duct shapes. In conjunction with the towing tank tests a potential-flow panel model (with viscous coupled duct) has been developed in order to predict the likely performance of the prototype thruster. The model has been validated against both the towing tank results, and against published data for standard ducted propeller units.

A representative waterjet intake duct has been tested using an open-circuit wind tunnel. Velocity proffles and surface pressure distributions have been obtained for three different flow regimes. In addition, a CFD model of the same inlet duct geometry has been developed using a fully viscous, commercial RANS flow solver. This model is validated against the wind tunnel test data and has been further developed to study the influence of trim and drift on the flow through the duct. In addition, a brief study on duct-hull interaction is presented.

Results from the experimental and computational tests on both the tip-driven propeller and waterjet intake duct are presented. The two validated CFD models are subsequently coupled together to investigate the performance implications of using a tip-driven, rather than shaft-driven, axial-flow waterjet impeller. It is shown that the use of a tip-driven impeller in a waterjet propulsion system has the potential to increase hydrodynamic performance. Removing the drive shaft from the system resulted in an increase in predicted impeller thrust of approximately KT=0.1. Finally, the practical implications of such a drive mechanism are discussed. It is seen that the use of an electromagnetic tip-drive is limited by the physical size of the motor.

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Published date: 2000

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 466975
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/466975
PURE UUID: 8ab13c92-7775-45ad-bc1c-345d4b3e84b5

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Date deposited: 05 Jul 2022 08:05
Last modified: 05 Jul 2022 08:05

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Contributors

Author: Adam William Hughes

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