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Incidence and prevalence of paediatric inflammatory bowel disease continues to increase in the south of England

Incidence and prevalence of paediatric inflammatory bowel disease continues to increase in the south of England
Incidence and prevalence of paediatric inflammatory bowel disease continues to increase in the south of England
Objective: the incidence of paediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has been increasing over 25-years, however contemporary trends are not established and the impact of COVID-19 on case rates is unclear.

Methods: data from Southampton Children’s hospital prospective IBD database were retrieved for 2002-2021. Incidence rates were calculated based on referral area populations and temporal trends analysed. Disease prevalence for those aged <18 years was calculated for 2017-2021. Monoclonal prescriptions were reported

Results: 1150 patients were included, mean age at diagnosis- 12.63 years, 40.5% female. 704 patients had Crohn’s disease (61.2%), 385 had ulcerative colitis (33.5%), and 61 had IBD unclassified (5.3%).

Overall IBD incidence increased, β= 0.843, p=3 x 10-6, driven by Crohn’s disease, β= 0.732, p=0.00024 and ulcerative colitis, β= 0.816, p=0.000011. There was no change in IBDU incidence, β= 0.230, p=0.33.

From 2002-2021, 51 patients were diagnosed <6 years of age, 160 patients aged 6 to <10 years and 939 patients aged 10 to <18 years of age. Increased incidence was observed in patients aged 10 to <18 years of age (β= 0.888, p=1.8 x 10-7). There was no significant change in incidence of IBD in <6 years (β= 0.124, p=0.57), or 6 to <10 years (β= 0.146, p=0.54).

IBD prevalence increased by an average of 1.71%/year from 2017-2021, β= 0.979, p=0.004. The number of new monoclonal prescriptions increased from 6 in 2007 to 111 in 2021.

Conclusions: IBD incidence continues to increase in Southern England. Compounding prevalence and increased monoclonal usage has implications for service provision.
0277-2116
Ashton, James J
03369017-99b5-40ae-9a43-14c98516f37d
Barakat, Farah M
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Barnes, Claire
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Coelho, Tracy Af
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Batra, Akshay
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Afzal, Nadeem A
62505946-2503-42ba-9b02-85513bb3ec87
Beattie, R Mark
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Ashton, James J
03369017-99b5-40ae-9a43-14c98516f37d
Barakat, Farah M
5a5a3ebf-141e-4c1d-abd3-630acdeceb3d
Barnes, Claire
a4cb4a00-7f2f-4aa2-aac0-e11e4946f9d1
Coelho, Tracy Af
a78b627c-ea78-41e1-9553-0390921e3c93
Batra, Akshay
822f891e-87ca-41d9-b68d-27c395e88809
Afzal, Nadeem A
62505946-2503-42ba-9b02-85513bb3ec87
Beattie, R Mark
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Ashton, James J, Barakat, Farah M, Barnes, Claire, Coelho, Tracy Af, Batra, Akshay, Afzal, Nadeem A and Beattie, R Mark (2022) Incidence and prevalence of paediatric inflammatory bowel disease continues to increase in the south of England. Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology & Nutrition. (doi:10.1097/MPG.0000000000003511).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Objective: the incidence of paediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has been increasing over 25-years, however contemporary trends are not established and the impact of COVID-19 on case rates is unclear.

Methods: data from Southampton Children’s hospital prospective IBD database were retrieved for 2002-2021. Incidence rates were calculated based on referral area populations and temporal trends analysed. Disease prevalence for those aged <18 years was calculated for 2017-2021. Monoclonal prescriptions were reported

Results: 1150 patients were included, mean age at diagnosis- 12.63 years, 40.5% female. 704 patients had Crohn’s disease (61.2%), 385 had ulcerative colitis (33.5%), and 61 had IBD unclassified (5.3%).

Overall IBD incidence increased, β= 0.843, p=3 x 10-6, driven by Crohn’s disease, β= 0.732, p=0.00024 and ulcerative colitis, β= 0.816, p=0.000011. There was no change in IBDU incidence, β= 0.230, p=0.33.

From 2002-2021, 51 patients were diagnosed <6 years of age, 160 patients aged 6 to <10 years and 939 patients aged 10 to <18 years of age. Increased incidence was observed in patients aged 10 to <18 years of age (β= 0.888, p=1.8 x 10-7). There was no significant change in incidence of IBD in <6 years (β= 0.124, p=0.57), or 6 to <10 years (β= 0.146, p=0.54).

IBD prevalence increased by an average of 1.71%/year from 2017-2021, β= 0.979, p=0.004. The number of new monoclonal prescriptions increased from 6 in 2007 to 111 in 2021.

Conclusions: IBD incidence continues to increase in Southern England. Compounding prevalence and increased monoclonal usage has implications for service provision.

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Untracked_Incidence and prevalence of PIBD - Accepted Manuscript
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e-pub ahead of print date: 6 June 2022

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 467306
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/467306
ISSN: 0277-2116
PURE UUID: 5ae8248d-8eeb-4501-9aba-e708b533dd3b
ORCID for James J Ashton: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0348-8198

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Date deposited: 05 Jul 2022 17:01
Last modified: 05 Aug 2022 01:53

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Contributors

Author: James J Ashton ORCID iD
Author: Farah M Barakat
Author: Claire Barnes
Author: Tracy Af Coelho
Author: Akshay Batra
Author: Nadeem A Afzal
Author: R Mark Beattie

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