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Personal carbon budgets: a PESTLE review

Personal carbon budgets: a PESTLE review
Personal carbon budgets: a PESTLE review
Personal Carbon Budgets (PCBs) are a radical policy innovation that seek to reduce an individual’s carbon consumption. This review identifies three archetypes of PCBs in the current literature; Personal Carbon Trading, Carbon Tax and Carbon Labelling. We theorised that carbon trading could affect equity and allow quality of life and consumption to be driven by income rather than needs. We, therefore, developed a new model (Personal Carbon Allowance with no trading) to compare to existing archetypes. A PESTLE (Political, Economic, Social, Technological, Legal, Environmental) framework was applied to each archetype to analyse and compare their costs and benefits and to critically evaluate and identify which model may be the most appropriate to reduce emissions severely but equitably. We conclude that the only model that can achieve this is our proposed Personal Carbon Allowance (PCA) model with no trading. PCA has a hard cap on emissions allowing for controllable severe cuts to emissions, and the lack of trading would prohibit those with wealth from continuing high-consumption lifestyles at the expense of those with lower incomes.
carbon budget, carbon footprint, sustainability, PESTLE, carbon
2071-1050
Brock, Alice
506feb54-f65a-46f1-b5fb-9ba4ac6e9b16
Kemp, Simon
942b35c0-3584-4ca1-bf9e-5f07790d6e36
Williams, Ian
c9d674ac-ee69-4937-ab43-17e716266e22
Brock, Alice
506feb54-f65a-46f1-b5fb-9ba4ac6e9b16
Kemp, Simon
942b35c0-3584-4ca1-bf9e-5f07790d6e36
Williams, Ian
c9d674ac-ee69-4937-ab43-17e716266e22

Brock, Alice, Kemp, Simon and Williams, Ian (2022) Personal carbon budgets: a PESTLE review. Sustainability, 14 (15), [9238]. (doi:10.3390/su14159238).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Personal Carbon Budgets (PCBs) are a radical policy innovation that seek to reduce an individual’s carbon consumption. This review identifies three archetypes of PCBs in the current literature; Personal Carbon Trading, Carbon Tax and Carbon Labelling. We theorised that carbon trading could affect equity and allow quality of life and consumption to be driven by income rather than needs. We, therefore, developed a new model (Personal Carbon Allowance with no trading) to compare to existing archetypes. A PESTLE (Political, Economic, Social, Technological, Legal, Environmental) framework was applied to each archetype to analyse and compare their costs and benefits and to critically evaluate and identify which model may be the most appropriate to reduce emissions severely but equitably. We conclude that the only model that can achieve this is our proposed Personal Carbon Allowance (PCA) model with no trading. PCA has a hard cap on emissions allowing for controllable severe cuts to emissions, and the lack of trading would prohibit those with wealth from continuing high-consumption lifestyles at the expense of those with lower incomes.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 26 July 2022
Published date: 28 July 2022
Keywords: carbon budget, carbon footprint, sustainability, PESTLE, carbon

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 469026
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/469026
ISSN: 2071-1050
PURE UUID: b423bacb-5dc1-4994-bb04-d46f6b2f919b
ORCID for Ian Williams: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-0121-1219

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Date deposited: 05 Sep 2022 16:55
Last modified: 06 Sep 2022 01:39

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