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Modelling skeletal pain harnessing tissue engineering

Modelling skeletal pain harnessing tissue engineering
Modelling skeletal pain harnessing tissue engineering
Bone pain typically occurs immediately following skeletal damage with mechanical distortion or rupture of nociceptive fibres. The pain mechanism is also associated with chronic pain conditions where the healing process is impaired. Any load impacting on the area of the fractured bone will stimulate the nociceptive response, necessitating rapid clinical intervention to relieve pain associated with the bone damage and appropriate mitigation of any processes involved with the loss of bone mass, muscle, and mobility and to prevent death. The following review has examined the mechanisms of pain associated with trauma or cancer-related skeletal damage focusing on new approaches for the development of innovative therapeutic interventions. In particular, the review highlights tissue engineering approaches that offer considerable promise in the application of functional biomimetic fabrication of bone and nerve tissues. The strategic combination of bone and nerve tissue engineered models provides significant potential to develop a new class of in vitro platforms, capable of replacing in vivo models and testing the safety and efficacy of novel drug treatments aimed at the resolution of bone-associated pain. To date, the field of bone pain research has centred on animal models, with a paucity of data correlating to the human physiological response. This review explores the evident gap in pain drug development research and suggests a step change in approach to harness tissue engineering technologies to recapitulate the complex pathophysiological environment of the damaged bone tissue enabling evaluation of the associated pain-mimicking mechanism with significant therapeutic potential therein for improved patient quality of life.
Iafrate, Lucia
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Benedetti, Maria
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Donsante, Samantha
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Rosa, Alessandro
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Corsi, Alessandro
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Oreffo, Richard
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Riminucci, Mara
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Ruocco, Giancarlo
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Scognamiglio, Chiara
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Cidonio, Gianluca
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Iafrate, Lucia
eea7d364-5cf1-4a0e-8e71-d16e9f7194ae
Benedetti, Maria
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Donsante, Samantha
56ecbafa-9155-42f8-9671-7d9aa62e51b7
Rosa, Alessandro
f912cf93-f747-4c8c-9bcd-a7f885cdd373
Corsi, Alessandro
c3cec36f-12d9-4f35-870f-22950b18492a
Oreffo, Richard
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Riminucci, Mara
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Ruocco, Giancarlo
31fdf479-a179-47c7-8d99-d2a4becccdde
Scognamiglio, Chiara
36c7d35b-3141-489d-b7cd-cbbc9f39e3ec
Cidonio, Gianluca
558ad583-899a-4d8c-b42b-bc1c354c8757

Iafrate, Lucia, Benedetti, Maria, Donsante, Samantha, Rosa, Alessandro, Corsi, Alessandro, Oreffo, Richard, Riminucci, Mara, Ruocco, Giancarlo, Scognamiglio, Chiara and Cidonio, Gianluca (2022) Modelling skeletal pain harnessing tissue engineering. In Vitro Models. (doi:10.1007/s44164-022-00028-7).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Bone pain typically occurs immediately following skeletal damage with mechanical distortion or rupture of nociceptive fibres. The pain mechanism is also associated with chronic pain conditions where the healing process is impaired. Any load impacting on the area of the fractured bone will stimulate the nociceptive response, necessitating rapid clinical intervention to relieve pain associated with the bone damage and appropriate mitigation of any processes involved with the loss of bone mass, muscle, and mobility and to prevent death. The following review has examined the mechanisms of pain associated with trauma or cancer-related skeletal damage focusing on new approaches for the development of innovative therapeutic interventions. In particular, the review highlights tissue engineering approaches that offer considerable promise in the application of functional biomimetic fabrication of bone and nerve tissues. The strategic combination of bone and nerve tissue engineered models provides significant potential to develop a new class of in vitro platforms, capable of replacing in vivo models and testing the safety and efficacy of novel drug treatments aimed at the resolution of bone-associated pain. To date, the field of bone pain research has centred on animal models, with a paucity of data correlating to the human physiological response. This review explores the evident gap in pain drug development research and suggests a step change in approach to harness tissue engineering technologies to recapitulate the complex pathophysiological environment of the damaged bone tissue enabling evaluation of the associated pain-mimicking mechanism with significant therapeutic potential therein for improved patient quality of life.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 4 July 2022
e-pub ahead of print date: 4 August 2022

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 469345
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/469345
PURE UUID: b6a4b534-e135-4341-b721-b0160d79e6c3
ORCID for Richard Oreffo: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5995-6726

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Date deposited: 13 Sep 2022 16:50
Last modified: 17 Sep 2022 01:37

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Contributors

Author: Lucia Iafrate
Author: Maria Benedetti
Author: Samantha Donsante
Author: Alessandro Rosa
Author: Alessandro Corsi
Author: Richard Oreffo ORCID iD
Author: Mara Riminucci
Author: Giancarlo Ruocco
Author: Chiara Scognamiglio
Author: Gianluca Cidonio

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