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Modification of glasses and optical waveguides using high electric fields

Modification of glasses and optical waveguides using high electric fields
Modification of glasses and optical waveguides using high electric fields
This thesis describes work done towards establishing efficient and reproducible second harmonic generation in thermally poled novel high-index bismuth-borate glass structures. According to the rectification model, glass with higher χ(3) values than silica would permit χ(2) to scale up proportionally, for a given frozen-in electric field strength. The fundamental research on poling induced nonlinearity has been extended to investigate several compositions of Bi2O3ZnOB2O3 glass systems, whose refractive index is measured to increase with the Bi2O3 content. Intrinsic third-order optical nonlinearity χ(3) up to thirty times higher than silica have been measured in bismuth-based compounds, and even larger values are potentially achievable.

In this thesis, a reliable procedure to induce large and stable second order nonlinear coefficient χ(2) in bismuthate glasses has been established along with the understanding towards efficient generation of second harmonic power in waveguiding layers. Characterization methods to determine the nonlinear formation dynamics and resolve nonlinear thickness and profile has been optimized to quantify the magnitude and distribution of second order nonlinearities in thermally poled bismuthate glasses. The development of a new poling procedure, where the applied voltage is varied during the cooling phase, instead of being kept constant, has allowed a record value of χ(2) = 2.3 pm/V in 12.5% Bi2O3 bulk samples to be achieved. The control of nonlinear region evolution gained by establishing the innovative time-varying voltage poling procedure has led to the first demonstration of second-order nonlinearity value as high as 2 pm/V induced by thermal poling in bismuthate sputtered slab waveguides.

These achievements opened new investigations towards realizing efficient monolithic structures leading to high performance active devices based on poled bismuth-based glass waveguides. In particular, an all-glass electro-optic modulator and a frequency doubler have been targeted, based on sputtering and femtosecond laser direct writing, respectively.
Mezzapesa, Francesco Paolo
90abe039-ed92-453a-ab10-aeb13e9fd93c
Mezzapesa, Francesco Paolo
90abe039-ed92-453a-ab10-aeb13e9fd93c
Kazansky, Peter
a5d123ec-8ea8-408c-8963-4a6d921fd76c
Wilkinson, James
73483cf3-d9f2-4688-9b09-1c84257884ca

Mezzapesa, Francesco Paolo (2007) Modification of glasses and optical waveguides using high electric fields. University of Southampton, Optoelectronic Research Centre, Doctoral Thesis, 160pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

This thesis describes work done towards establishing efficient and reproducible second harmonic generation in thermally poled novel high-index bismuth-borate glass structures. According to the rectification model, glass with higher χ(3) values than silica would permit χ(2) to scale up proportionally, for a given frozen-in electric field strength. The fundamental research on poling induced nonlinearity has been extended to investigate several compositions of Bi2O3ZnOB2O3 glass systems, whose refractive index is measured to increase with the Bi2O3 content. Intrinsic third-order optical nonlinearity χ(3) up to thirty times higher than silica have been measured in bismuth-based compounds, and even larger values are potentially achievable.

In this thesis, a reliable procedure to induce large and stable second order nonlinear coefficient χ(2) in bismuthate glasses has been established along with the understanding towards efficient generation of second harmonic power in waveguiding layers. Characterization methods to determine the nonlinear formation dynamics and resolve nonlinear thickness and profile has been optimized to quantify the magnitude and distribution of second order nonlinearities in thermally poled bismuthate glasses. The development of a new poling procedure, where the applied voltage is varied during the cooling phase, instead of being kept constant, has allowed a record value of χ(2) = 2.3 pm/V in 12.5% Bi2O3 bulk samples to be achieved. The control of nonlinear region evolution gained by establishing the innovative time-varying voltage poling procedure has led to the first demonstration of second-order nonlinearity value as high as 2 pm/V induced by thermal poling in bismuthate sputtered slab waveguides.

These achievements opened new investigations towards realizing efficient monolithic structures leading to high performance active devices based on poled bismuth-based glass waveguides. In particular, an all-glass electro-optic modulator and a frequency doubler have been targeted, based on sputtering and femtosecond laser direct writing, respectively.

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More information

Published date: May 2007
Organisations: University of Southampton, Optoelectronics Research Centre

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 47758
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/47758
PURE UUID: f72534ba-b0a0-4681-b81e-c2b0543bb7ab
ORCID for James Wilkinson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4712-1697

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 15 Aug 2007
Last modified: 12 Dec 2021 02:32

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Contributors

Author: Francesco Paolo Mezzapesa
Thesis advisor: Peter Kazansky
Thesis advisor: James Wilkinson ORCID iD

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