The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

The analysis of partially separated flow on sail systems using a sectional method

The analysis of partially separated flow on sail systems using a sectional method
The analysis of partially separated flow on sail systems using a sectional method
Yacht sail systems are subjected to low speed and transitional flow. Because of the
supporting structure (mast and boom) of the sail system and the curvature of sail
membrane, sail systems also have a partially separated flow.

In this work, it is introduced the sectional method as a sail system flow analysis tool.
The sectional method uses the surface discretization and it is based in the simultaneous
approach for viscous-inviscid interaction but, it works independently to the initial panel
mesh and inviscid panel method calculation, permitting the adjustment of sectional
points to have a better local convergence.

The sectional method is applied to the detection of separated flow regions by means
of integral boundary layer parameters investigation. The investigation is used in cases
of weak separation and strong separation, when analysing mast and sail configurations.
The weak separation detection is applied to a three-dimensional sail shape in a sail
design problem: the study of parameters such as twist and section curvature in order
to control separation on the sail.
Veiga, Augusto Elisio Lessa
4583c3be-e473-4595-8bd3-e6265ee8e089
Veiga, Augusto Elisio Lessa
4583c3be-e473-4595-8bd3-e6265ee8e089
Turnock, Stephen
d6442f5c-d9af-4fdb-8406-7c79a92b26ce
Wilson, Philip
8307fa11-5d5e-47f6-9961-9d43767afa00
Molland, Anthony
917272d0-ada8-4b1b-8191-1611875ef9ca
Campbell, Ian
e43a0bed-298f-4653-a0de-5b011b02b644

Veiga, Augusto Elisio Lessa (2006) The analysis of partially separated flow on sail systems using a sectional method. University of Southampton, School of Engineering Sciences, Doctoral Thesis, 224pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

Yacht sail systems are subjected to low speed and transitional flow. Because of the
supporting structure (mast and boom) of the sail system and the curvature of sail
membrane, sail systems also have a partially separated flow.

In this work, it is introduced the sectional method as a sail system flow analysis tool.
The sectional method uses the surface discretization and it is based in the simultaneous
approach for viscous-inviscid interaction but, it works independently to the initial panel
mesh and inviscid panel method calculation, permitting the adjustment of sectional
points to have a better local convergence.

The sectional method is applied to the detection of separated flow regions by means
of integral boundary layer parameters investigation. The investigation is used in cases
of weak separation and strong separation, when analysing mast and sail configurations.
The weak separation detection is applied to a three-dimensional sail shape in a sail
design problem: the study of parameters such as twist and section curvature in order
to control separation on the sail.

Text
Veiga_thesis.pdf - Other
Download (8MB)
Text
Appendix_E_23012006.pdf - Other
Download (261kB)

More information

Published date: 3 November 2006
Organisations: University of Southampton, Fluid Structure Interactions Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 51287
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/51287
PURE UUID: 92bf6151-20dd-4769-8e72-5f45e509b216
ORCID for Stephen Turnock: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-6288-0400
ORCID for Philip Wilson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6939-682X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 22 May 2008
Last modified: 14 Mar 2019 01:56

Export record

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×