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Development of non-linear waveguide devices for optical signal processing

Development of non-linear waveguide devices for optical signal processing
Development of non-linear waveguide devices for optical signal processing
Reported in this thesis are advances in glass poling, a technique which produces second-order optical nonlinearity in glass. Poling of glass has drawn much attention because frequency conversion and electro-optic modulation, operations which are typically restricted to crystals, becomes feasible in glass fibres and waveguides which are widely spread media in photonics thanks to their excellent optical properties and mature manufacturing technology. Poled silica glass, despite showing about 10 times lower second-order nonlinearity than nonlinear crystals, can be competitive with them because longer interaction lengths are possible in glass fibres, owing to the lower chromatic dispersion. -gratings in fibres. This technology led to the first demonstration of an all-fibre frequency doubler of a fibre laser. Milliwatts of red light in the fundamental mode were produced by frequency doubling in a quasi-phase matched periodically poled silica fibre which was directly spliced to the output of the laser source. Efficiency up to 2.5% has been demonstrated in 11.5 cm long device with only about 100W of pump power, which means that 50% conversion efficiency is expected for a 2kW input power.
Corbari, Costantino
273904e8-5f90-4110-bc17-3d3f2c27d461
Corbari, Costantino
273904e8-5f90-4110-bc17-3d3f2c27d461
Kazansky, Peter
a5d123ec-8ea8-408c-8963-4a6d921fd76c

Corbari, Costantino (2005) Development of non-linear waveguide devices for optical signal processing. University of Southampton, Optoelectronic Research Centre, Doctoral Thesis, 153pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

Reported in this thesis are advances in glass poling, a technique which produces second-order optical nonlinearity in glass. Poling of glass has drawn much attention because frequency conversion and electro-optic modulation, operations which are typically restricted to crystals, becomes feasible in glass fibres and waveguides which are widely spread media in photonics thanks to their excellent optical properties and mature manufacturing technology. Poled silica glass, despite showing about 10 times lower second-order nonlinearity than nonlinear crystals, can be competitive with them because longer interaction lengths are possible in glass fibres, owing to the lower chromatic dispersion. -gratings in fibres. This technology led to the first demonstration of an all-fibre frequency doubler of a fibre laser. Milliwatts of red light in the fundamental mode were produced by frequency doubling in a quasi-phase matched periodically poled silica fibre which was directly spliced to the output of the laser source. Efficiency up to 2.5% has been demonstrated in 11.5 cm long device with only about 100W of pump power, which means that 50% conversion efficiency is expected for a 2kW input power.

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Published date: June 2005
Organisations: University of Southampton

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 65506
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/65506
PURE UUID: 16ce70df-6dd4-4b4e-97f3-ca80ea0afaa1

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Date deposited: 23 Feb 2009
Last modified: 19 Jul 2017 00:33

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Contributors

Author: Costantino Corbari
Thesis advisor: Peter Kazansky

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