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Automated multi-stage geometry parameterization of internal fluid flow applications

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

The search for the most effective method for the geometric parameterization of many internal fluid flow applications is ongoing. This thesis focuses on providing a general purpose automated parameterization strategy for use in design optimization. Commercial Computer-Aided Design (CAD) software, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software and optimizer tools are brought together to offer a generic and practical solution. A multi-stage parameterization technique for three-dimensional surface manipulation is proposed. The first stage in the process defines the geometry in a global sense, allowing large scale freedom to produce a wide variety of shapes using only a small set of design variables. Invariably, optimization using a simplified global parameterization does not provide small scale detail required for an optimal solution of a complex geometry. Therefore, a second stage is used subsequently to fine-tune the geometry with respect to the objective function being optimized. By using Kriging response surface methodology to support the optimization studies, two diverse applications, a Formula One airbox and a human carotid artery bifurcation, can be concisely represented through a global parameterization followed by a local parameterization.

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Citation

Hoyle, Nicola (2006) Automated multi-stage geometry parameterization of internal fluid flow applications University of Southampton, School of Electronics and Computer Science, Doctoral Thesis , 238pp.

More information

Published date: September 2006
Organisations: University of Southampton

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 72028
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/72028
PURE UUID: e40ce238-7ab2-404a-a743-439679d9bf95

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 15 Jan 2010
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 23:57

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Contributors

Author: Nicola Hoyle
Thesis advisor: Andrew Keane
Thesis advisor: Neil Bressloff

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