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Optical fibre amplifiers

Optical fibre amplifiers
Optical fibre amplifiers
During the 1980s there has been increasing interest in rare-earth doped, single mode fibres for devices and sensors, of which the most exciting results have been achieved with erbium doped fibre amplifiers (EDFA). Great progress has been made since the first EDFA was reported by Mears in 1987. A gain of 26dB was achieved whereas 46.5dB has now been demonstrated. High speed, direct detection in fibre based transmission systems has allowed bit rates and transmission distances to be markedly increased. For example, use of twelve 1.48µm laser diode pumped EDFAs as power amplifiers has allowed transmission of 1.2 Gbit/s over more than 900km of fibre. The power penalty arising from dispersion and the presence of the EDFAs was only 0.6dB at 10 BER, with no observed error floor due to accumulated noise. A number of similar systems have also been demonstrated with alternative pump sources and device configurations. Thus the compatibility of EDFAs with long-haul communications systems has clearly been demonstrated. However, simultaneous improvement in manufacture and design of doped fibres has been essential. Here, the techniques for manufacture of such fibres are described and design criteria for optimal performance outlined. First, however, the advantages of EDFAs are summarised
Townsend, J.E.
a5a6f6ef-adb0-4072-8dcb-b6f5b5a47e64
Laming, R.I.
c86f359b-9145-4148-bc7d-ae4f3d272ca2
Townsend, J.E.
a5a6f6ef-adb0-4072-8dcb-b6f5b5a47e64
Laming, R.I.
c86f359b-9145-4148-bc7d-ae4f3d272ca2

Townsend, J.E. and Laming, R.I. (1990) Optical fibre amplifiers. XXI General Assembly of the International Union of Radio Science, Czech Republic.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

During the 1980s there has been increasing interest in rare-earth doped, single mode fibres for devices and sensors, of which the most exciting results have been achieved with erbium doped fibre amplifiers (EDFA). Great progress has been made since the first EDFA was reported by Mears in 1987. A gain of 26dB was achieved whereas 46.5dB has now been demonstrated. High speed, direct detection in fibre based transmission systems has allowed bit rates and transmission distances to be markedly increased. For example, use of twelve 1.48µm laser diode pumped EDFAs as power amplifiers has allowed transmission of 1.2 Gbit/s over more than 900km of fibre. The power penalty arising from dispersion and the presence of the EDFAs was only 0.6dB at 10 BER, with no observed error floor due to accumulated noise. A number of similar systems have also been demonstrated with alternative pump sources and device configurations. Thus the compatibility of EDFAs with long-haul communications systems has clearly been demonstrated. However, simultaneous improvement in manufacture and design of doped fibres has been essential. Here, the techniques for manufacture of such fibres are described and design criteria for optimal performance outlined. First, however, the advantages of EDFAs are summarised

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Published date: August 1990
Venue - Dates: XXI General Assembly of the International Union of Radio Science, Czech Republic, 1990-08-01

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Local EPrints ID: 77473
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/77473
PURE UUID: 2b322bd0-195b-4ba5-9471-41e467db41de

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Date deposited: 11 Mar 2010
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 23:32

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Contributors

Author: J.E. Townsend
Author: R.I. Laming

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