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Making it rich and personal: meeting institutional challenges from next generation learning environments

Making it rich and personal: meeting institutional challenges from next generation learning environments
Making it rich and personal: meeting institutional challenges from next generation learning environments
The understanding that personal learning environments provide a more realistic and workable perspective of learners’ interactions with and use of technology has gained widespread acceptance across many of the communities interested in learning and teaching technologies within higher education. However in universities the service which normally purchases and deploys technology infrastructure is typically, and understandable, risk-averse, the more so, because the consequences of expensive decisions about infrastructure will stay with the organisations for many years. Furthermore across the broader academic community the awareness of and familiarity with technologies in support of learning may be varied. In this context work to innovate the learning environment will require considerable team effort and collective commitment. This paper presents a case study account of institutional processes harnessed to establish a universal personal learning environment fit for the 21st century. The challenges encountered were consequential of our working definition of a learning environment which went beyond simple implementation – in our experience the requirements became summarised as ‘its more than a system, it’s a mindset’. As well as deploying technology ‘fit for purpose’ we were seeking to create an environment which could play an integral and catalytic part in the university’s role of enabling transformative education. Our ambitions and aspirations derive from evidence in the literature, for example, van Harmelen on personal learning environments (2006), Downes on e-learning 2.0 (2005) and the recent report by Bradwell for Demos on the Edgeless University (2009). We have also drawn on evidence of our recent and current performance; gauged by institutional benchmarking and an extensive student survey. The paper will present and analyse this qualitative and quantitative data. We will provide an account and analysis of our progress to achieve change, the methods we used, problems encountered and the decisions we made on the way.
Personal Learning Environments PLE case study organisational change higher education Technology Enhance Learning TEL
White, Su
5f9a277b-df62-4079-ae97-b9c35264c146
Davis, Hugh C
1608a3c8-0920-4a0c-82b3-ee29a52e7c1b
Morris, Debra
3bb922d3-9b9e-4b19-a766-fcedb9e95345
Hancock, Pete
52085f10-9e2e-4ca2-aae5-a623fa55de3f
White, Su
5f9a277b-df62-4079-ae97-b9c35264c146
Davis, Hugh C
1608a3c8-0920-4a0c-82b3-ee29a52e7c1b
Morris, Debra
3bb922d3-9b9e-4b19-a766-fcedb9e95345
Hancock, Pete
52085f10-9e2e-4ca2-aae5-a623fa55de3f

White, Su, Davis, Hugh C, Morris, Debra and Hancock, Pete (2010) Making it rich and personal: meeting institutional challenges from next generation learning environments. The PLE conference 2010, Citilab, Cornella, Barcelona, Spain. 07 - 08 Jul 2010. (In Press)

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

The understanding that personal learning environments provide a more realistic and workable perspective of learners’ interactions with and use of technology has gained widespread acceptance across many of the communities interested in learning and teaching technologies within higher education. However in universities the service which normally purchases and deploys technology infrastructure is typically, and understandable, risk-averse, the more so, because the consequences of expensive decisions about infrastructure will stay with the organisations for many years. Furthermore across the broader academic community the awareness of and familiarity with technologies in support of learning may be varied. In this context work to innovate the learning environment will require considerable team effort and collective commitment. This paper presents a case study account of institutional processes harnessed to establish a universal personal learning environment fit for the 21st century. The challenges encountered were consequential of our working definition of a learning environment which went beyond simple implementation – in our experience the requirements became summarised as ‘its more than a system, it’s a mindset’. As well as deploying technology ‘fit for purpose’ we were seeking to create an environment which could play an integral and catalytic part in the university’s role of enabling transformative education. Our ambitions and aspirations derive from evidence in the literature, for example, van Harmelen on personal learning environments (2006), Downes on e-learning 2.0 (2005) and the recent report by Bradwell for Demos on the Edgeless University (2009). We have also drawn on evidence of our recent and current performance; gauged by institutional benchmarking and an extensive student survey. The paper will present and analyse this qualitative and quantitative data. We will provide an account and analysis of our progress to achieve change, the methods we used, problems encountered and the decisions we made on the way.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 2 July 2010
Additional Information: Event Dates: 8-9 July 2010
Venue - Dates: The PLE conference 2010, Citilab, Cornella, Barcelona, Spain, 2010-07-07 - 2010-07-08
Keywords: Personal Learning Environments PLE case study organisational change higher education Technology Enhance Learning TEL
Organisations: Web & Internet Science

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 271327
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/271327
PURE UUID: c9fcf055-32b6-4855-bbca-532201065fcc
ORCID for Su White: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9588-5275
ORCID for Hugh C Davis: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1182-1459

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 02 Jul 2010 11:33
Last modified: 29 Sep 2020 01:33

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Contributors

Author: Su White ORCID iD
Author: Hugh C Davis ORCID iD
Author: Debra Morris
Author: Pete Hancock

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