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Production of volatile fatty acids from slaughterhouse blood by mixed-culture fermentation

Production of volatile fatty acids from slaughterhouse blood by mixed-culture fermentation
Production of volatile fatty acids from slaughterhouse blood by mixed-culture fermentation
The volatile fatty acids (VFA) production potential from animal blood and the factors affecting this process were investigated in this study. In order to simulate an industrial process different operation modes, batch, fed batch and semi-continuous, were also evaluated. Due to high ammonia concentration in fermentation broth, VFA concentration up to 100 g L-1 was achieved without addition of buffer and methanogen inhibitor. In general, acetic, n-butyric and iso-valeric acids were the most predominant species, although different operational conditions affected the VFA concentration, profile, production rate and yield. The microbial community analysis was conducted on the reactors with the best performance, revealing that 70-90% of the microbial population was from the Clostridiales order with a strong presence from the Sporanaerobacter genus. These results demonstrated the feasibility of a VFA-platform bio-refinery using high-protein wastes as substrate via mixed-culture fermentation under non-sterilised conditions.
621–634
Plácido, Jersson
ea879e6c-acb1-484c-a44a-655145e70b0a
Zhang, Yue
69b11d32-d555-46e4-a333-88eee4628ae7
Plácido, Jersson
ea879e6c-acb1-484c-a44a-655145e70b0a
Zhang, Yue
69b11d32-d555-46e4-a333-88eee4628ae7

Plácido, Jersson and Zhang, Yue (2018) Production of volatile fatty acids from slaughterhouse blood by mixed-culture fermentation. Biomass Conversion and Biorefinery, 8 (3), 621–634. (doi:10.1007/s13399-018-0313-y).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The volatile fatty acids (VFA) production potential from animal blood and the factors affecting this process were investigated in this study. In order to simulate an industrial process different operation modes, batch, fed batch and semi-continuous, were also evaluated. Due to high ammonia concentration in fermentation broth, VFA concentration up to 100 g L-1 was achieved without addition of buffer and methanogen inhibitor. In general, acetic, n-butyric and iso-valeric acids were the most predominant species, although different operational conditions affected the VFA concentration, profile, production rate and yield. The microbial community analysis was conducted on the reactors with the best performance, revealing that 70-90% of the microbial population was from the Clostridiales order with a strong presence from the Sporanaerobacter genus. These results demonstrated the feasibility of a VFA-platform bio-refinery using high-protein wastes as substrate via mixed-culture fermentation under non-sterilised conditions.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 6 April 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 5 May 2018
Published date: September 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 420280
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/420280
PURE UUID: b90be336-7e36-4b33-9260-6e52470d7dd9
ORCID for Yue Zhang: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-5068-2260

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 03 May 2018 16:30
Last modified: 10 Dec 2019 05:26

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