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Frequency of heavy vehicle traffic and association with DNA methylation at age 18 years in a subset of the Isle of Wight birth cohort

Frequency of heavy vehicle traffic and association with DNA methylation at age 18 years in a subset of the Isle of Wight birth cohort
Frequency of heavy vehicle traffic and association with DNA methylation at age 18 years in a subset of the Isle of Wight birth cohort

Assessment of changes in DNA methylation (DNA-m) has the potential to identify adverse environmental exposures. To examine DNA-m among a subset of participants (n = 369) in the Isle of Wight birth cohort who reported variable near resident traffic frequencies. We used self-reported frequencies of heavy vehicles passing by the homes of study subjects as a proxy measure for TRAP, which were: never, seldom, 10 per day, 1-9 per hour and >10 per hour. Methylation of cytosine-phosphate-guanine (CpG) dinucleotide sequences in the DNA was assessed from blood samples collected at age 18 years (n = 369) in the F1 generation. We conducted an epigenome wide association study to examine CpGs related to the frequency of heavy vehicles passing by subjects' homes, and employed multiple linear regression models to assess potential associations. We repeated some of these analysis in the F2 generation (n = 140). Thirty-five CpG sites were associated with heavy vehicular traffic. After adjusting for confounders, we found 23 CpGs that were more methylated, and 11 CpGs that were less methylated with increasing heavy vehicular traffic frequency among all subjects. In the F2 generation, 2 of 31 CpGs were associated with traffic frequencies and the direction of the effect was the same as in the F1 subset while differential methylation of 7 of 31 CpG sites correlated with gene expression. Our findings reveal differences in DNA-m in participants who reported higher heavy vehicular traffic frequencies when compared to participants who reported lower frequencies.

dvy028
Commodore, A.
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Mukherjee, N.
70ae2002-4263-429f-930c-1d6f39ffad17
Chung, D.
2e971c4e-3b1b-4bfd-b2c2-f58b5ecb58a4
Svendsen, E.
2c5c7194-f23b-42c6-a745-ff309010361e
Vena, J
2a9685fe-611e-4602-ab01-ab891d7cc4f0
Pearce, J.
2e64f1c2-a921-4c59-b43c-d89bf20e4d3e
Roberts, J.
93af5344-fbb4-4a2b-9feb-836ad4a3efac
Arshad, S.H.
917e246d-2e60-472f-8d30-94b01ef28958
Karmaus, W.
d78616d6-bc9c-4664-a461-7c0d0be5e39e
Commodore, A.
41abc0f4-a322-4339-ac8b-255d8f51e18b
Mukherjee, N.
70ae2002-4263-429f-930c-1d6f39ffad17
Chung, D.
2e971c4e-3b1b-4bfd-b2c2-f58b5ecb58a4
Svendsen, E.
2c5c7194-f23b-42c6-a745-ff309010361e
Vena, J
2a9685fe-611e-4602-ab01-ab891d7cc4f0
Pearce, J.
2e64f1c2-a921-4c59-b43c-d89bf20e4d3e
Roberts, J.
93af5344-fbb4-4a2b-9feb-836ad4a3efac
Arshad, S.H.
917e246d-2e60-472f-8d30-94b01ef28958
Karmaus, W.
d78616d6-bc9c-4664-a461-7c0d0be5e39e

Commodore, A., Mukherjee, N., Chung, D., Svendsen, E., Vena, J, Pearce, J., Roberts, J., Arshad, S.H. and Karmaus, W. (2019) Frequency of heavy vehicle traffic and association with DNA methylation at age 18 years in a subset of the Isle of Wight birth cohort. Environmental Epigenetics, 4 (4), dvy028. (doi:10.1093/eep/dvy028).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Assessment of changes in DNA methylation (DNA-m) has the potential to identify adverse environmental exposures. To examine DNA-m among a subset of participants (n = 369) in the Isle of Wight birth cohort who reported variable near resident traffic frequencies. We used self-reported frequencies of heavy vehicles passing by the homes of study subjects as a proxy measure for TRAP, which were: never, seldom, 10 per day, 1-9 per hour and >10 per hour. Methylation of cytosine-phosphate-guanine (CpG) dinucleotide sequences in the DNA was assessed from blood samples collected at age 18 years (n = 369) in the F1 generation. We conducted an epigenome wide association study to examine CpGs related to the frequency of heavy vehicles passing by subjects' homes, and employed multiple linear regression models to assess potential associations. We repeated some of these analysis in the F2 generation (n = 140). Thirty-five CpG sites were associated with heavy vehicular traffic. After adjusting for confounders, we found 23 CpGs that were more methylated, and 11 CpGs that were less methylated with increasing heavy vehicular traffic frequency among all subjects. In the F2 generation, 2 of 31 CpGs were associated with traffic frequencies and the direction of the effect was the same as in the F1 subset while differential methylation of 7 of 31 CpG sites correlated with gene expression. Our findings reveal differences in DNA-m in participants who reported higher heavy vehicular traffic frequencies when compared to participants who reported lower frequencies.

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Accepted/In Press date: 7 December 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 23 January 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 434707
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/434707
PURE UUID: f23478e5-5c7e-4158-8383-65b4a2adefb1

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Date deposited: 07 Oct 2019 16:30
Last modified: 29 Nov 2019 17:30

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