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β-1,3/1,6-glucans and Immunity: state of the art and future directions

β-1,3/1,6-glucans and Immunity: state of the art and future directions
β-1,3/1,6-glucans and Immunity: state of the art and future directions
The innate immune system responds in a rapid and non-specific manner against immunologic threats; inflammation is part of this response. This is followed by a slower but targeted and specific response termed the adaptive or acquired immune response. There is emerging evidence that dietary components, including yeast-derived β-glucans, can aid host defense against pathogens by modulating inflammatory and antimicrobial activity of neutrophils and macrophages. Innate Immune Training refers to a newly recognized phenomenon wherein compounds may ‘train’ innate immune cells, such that monocyte and macrophage precursor biology is altered to mount a more effective immunological response. Although various human studies have been carried out, much uncertainty still exists and further studies are required to fully elucidate the relationship between β-glucan supplementation and human immune function. This review offers an up-to-date report on yeast-derived β-glucans as immuno-modulators, including a brief overview of the current paradigm regarding the interaction of β-glucans with the immune system. The recent pre-clinical work that has partly decrypted mode of action and the newest evidence from human trials, are also reviewed. According to pre-clinical studies, β-1,3/1,6-glucan derived from Baker’s Yeast may offer increased immuno-surveillance, although the human evidence is weaker than that gained from pre-clinical studies.
diet and inflammation, innate immunity, metabolic-inflammation, trained immunity, yeast β-glucan
1613-4125
De Marco Castro, Elena
608ae192-9fab-47c0-bb08-c5f40288aa62
Calder, Philip
1797e54f-378e-4dcb-80a4-3e30018f07a6
M Roche, Helen
46f14e39-e30f-40c3-b76d-adda36040ed8
De Marco Castro, Elena
608ae192-9fab-47c0-bb08-c5f40288aa62
Calder, Philip
1797e54f-378e-4dcb-80a4-3e30018f07a6
M Roche, Helen
46f14e39-e30f-40c3-b76d-adda36040ed8

De Marco Castro, Elena, Calder, Philip and M Roche, Helen (2020) β-1,3/1,6-glucans and Immunity: state of the art and future directions. Molecular Nutrition & Food Research. (doi:10.1002/mnfr.201901071).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The innate immune system responds in a rapid and non-specific manner against immunologic threats; inflammation is part of this response. This is followed by a slower but targeted and specific response termed the adaptive or acquired immune response. There is emerging evidence that dietary components, including yeast-derived β-glucans, can aid host defense against pathogens by modulating inflammatory and antimicrobial activity of neutrophils and macrophages. Innate Immune Training refers to a newly recognized phenomenon wherein compounds may ‘train’ innate immune cells, such that monocyte and macrophage precursor biology is altered to mount a more effective immunological response. Although various human studies have been carried out, much uncertainty still exists and further studies are required to fully elucidate the relationship between β-glucan supplementation and human immune function. This review offers an up-to-date report on yeast-derived β-glucans as immuno-modulators, including a brief overview of the current paradigm regarding the interaction of β-glucans with the immune system. The recent pre-clinical work that has partly decrypted mode of action and the newest evidence from human trials, are also reviewed. According to pre-clinical studies, β-1,3/1,6-glucan derived from Baker’s Yeast may offer increased immuno-surveillance, although the human evidence is weaker than that gained from pre-clinical studies.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 3 March 2020
e-pub ahead of print date: 29 March 2020
Keywords: diet and inflammation, innate immunity, metabolic-inflammation, trained immunity, yeast β-glucan

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 438559
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/438559
ISSN: 1613-4125
PURE UUID: fdc1c80d-31e9-4653-9e2f-399b5e5f2354
ORCID for Philip Calder: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6038-710X

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Date deposited: 17 Mar 2020 17:30
Last modified: 11 Mar 2021 02:35

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Contributors

Author: Elena De Marco Castro
Author: Philip Calder ORCID iD
Author: Helen M Roche

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