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Integrated phytomanagement of a carbon tetrachloride-contaminated site in Murdock, Nebraska (USA)

Integrated phytomanagement of a carbon tetrachloride-contaminated site in Murdock, Nebraska (USA)
Integrated phytomanagement of a carbon tetrachloride-contaminated site in Murdock, Nebraska (USA)

The application of a large-scale (ca. 59,000 m 2) integrated phytomanagement system at a carbon tetrachloride (CCl 4)-impacted site at Murdock, Nebraska, USA, was assessed in terms of its effectiveness in mitigating site risk, and realizing wider social and environmental benefits. Volatile Organic Compound (VOCs) concentrations (including CCl 4) measured in surface water, groundwater, air and vegetation samples show that the Murdock system has achieved effective risk management over the 10+ year period since its implementation, with the phytomanagement component of the remediation system (consisting of a mixed stand of dominantly Niobe willow (Salix x ‘Niobe’) and Eastern Cottonwood (Populus deltoides)) removing 300g–600g of CCl 4 annually. Eastern Cottonwood played an increasing role in CCl 4 removal over time, from 55% of the total mass removal in 2008 to 69% in 2014. Using a site design focused on enhancement of the social and physical environment, in addition to risk mitigation, has enabled realization of a range of wider social and environmental benefits, which include carbon sequestration of ca. 77 tons CO 2/ha/y, and educational and recreational benefits. The phytomanagement system applied at Murdock has incurred significant installation, and on-going monitoring and maintenance, effort and costs (exceeding $1.5 million) highlighting the importance of (a) sustained stakeholder engagement to ensure continued local community support, and (b) effective site design to realize as full a range of core (i.e. risk mitigation) and wider benefits as possible, to increase the overall value proposition of such schemes.

Carbon tetrachloride, Groundwater, Phytomanagement, Phytoremediation, Stakeholder engagement, Sustainable remediation
0959-6526
Cundy, Andrew B.
994fdc96-2dce-40f4-b74b-dc638286eb08
Lafreniere, Lorraine
46ef72d8-51bc-41fe-9458-5646b5e4bc51
Bardos, R. Paul
2479866a-01e2-4f83-bafc-5ed5a42efdc9
Yan, Eugene
6d34ff2c-6c0e-46c5-8802-53282a035cd2
Sedivy, Robert
ea3a68f2-8ff6-47c5-8846-1632edaa61e0
Roe, Caroline
d425eb44-45c5-493d-bd0b-fe5d541df4f7
Cundy, Andrew B.
994fdc96-2dce-40f4-b74b-dc638286eb08
Lafreniere, Lorraine
46ef72d8-51bc-41fe-9458-5646b5e4bc51
Bardos, R. Paul
2479866a-01e2-4f83-bafc-5ed5a42efdc9
Yan, Eugene
6d34ff2c-6c0e-46c5-8802-53282a035cd2
Sedivy, Robert
ea3a68f2-8ff6-47c5-8846-1632edaa61e0
Roe, Caroline
d425eb44-45c5-493d-bd0b-fe5d541df4f7

Cundy, Andrew B., Lafreniere, Lorraine, Bardos, R. Paul, Yan, Eugene, Sedivy, Robert and Roe, Caroline (2020) Integrated phytomanagement of a carbon tetrachloride-contaminated site in Murdock, Nebraska (USA). Journal of Cleaner Production, [125190]. (doi:10.1016/j.jclepro.2020.125190).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The application of a large-scale (ca. 59,000 m 2) integrated phytomanagement system at a carbon tetrachloride (CCl 4)-impacted site at Murdock, Nebraska, USA, was assessed in terms of its effectiveness in mitigating site risk, and realizing wider social and environmental benefits. Volatile Organic Compound (VOCs) concentrations (including CCl 4) measured in surface water, groundwater, air and vegetation samples show that the Murdock system has achieved effective risk management over the 10+ year period since its implementation, with the phytomanagement component of the remediation system (consisting of a mixed stand of dominantly Niobe willow (Salix x ‘Niobe’) and Eastern Cottonwood (Populus deltoides)) removing 300g–600g of CCl 4 annually. Eastern Cottonwood played an increasing role in CCl 4 removal over time, from 55% of the total mass removal in 2008 to 69% in 2014. Using a site design focused on enhancement of the social and physical environment, in addition to risk mitigation, has enabled realization of a range of wider social and environmental benefits, which include carbon sequestration of ca. 77 tons CO 2/ha/y, and educational and recreational benefits. The phytomanagement system applied at Murdock has incurred significant installation, and on-going monitoring and maintenance, effort and costs (exceeding $1.5 million) highlighting the importance of (a) sustained stakeholder engagement to ensure continued local community support, and (b) effective site design to realize as full a range of core (i.e. risk mitigation) and wider benefits as possible, to increase the overall value proposition of such schemes.

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Restricted to Repository staff only until 18 November 2022.
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Supporting Information S1 Jnl Cleaner Prod - Accepted Manuscript
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Supporting Information S2 Jnl Cleaner Prod - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 13 November 2020
Published date: 18 November 2020
Keywords: Carbon tetrachloride, Groundwater, Phytomanagement, Phytoremediation, Stakeholder engagement, Sustainable remediation

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 445856
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/445856
ISSN: 0959-6526
PURE UUID: 02105c18-0326-4743-bd0f-b7cf91fb7df3
ORCID for Andrew B. Cundy: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4368-2569

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 12 Jan 2021 17:31
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 17:25

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