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Gut microbial and metabolic profiling reveal the lingering effects of infantile iron deficiency unless treated with iron

Gut microbial and metabolic profiling reveal the lingering effects of infantile iron deficiency unless treated with iron
Gut microbial and metabolic profiling reveal the lingering effects of infantile iron deficiency unless treated with iron

SCOPE: Iron deficiency (ID) compromises the health of infants worldwide. Although readily treated with iron, concerns remain about the persistence of some effects. Metabolic and gut microbial consequences of infantile ID were investigated in juvenile monkeys after natural recovery (pID) from iron deficiency or post-treatment with iron dextran and B vitamins (pID+Fe).

METHODS AND RESULTS: Metabolomic profiling of urine and plasma is conducted with 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Gut microbiota are characterized from rectal swabs by amplicon sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Urinary metabolic profiles of pID monkeys significantly differed from pID+Fe and continuously iron-sufficient controls (IS) with higher maltose and lower amounts of microbial-derived metabolites. Persistent differences in energy metabolism are apparent from the plasma metabolic phenotypes with greater reliance on anaerobic glycolysis in pID monkeys. Microbial profiling indicated higher abundances of Methanobrevibacter, Lachnobacterium, and Ruminococcus in pID monkeys and any history of ID resulted in a lower Prevotella abundance compared to the IS controls.

CONCLUSIONS: Lingering metabolic and microbial effects are found after natural recovery from ID. These long-term biochemical derangements are not present in the pID+Fe animals emphasizing the importance of the early detection and treatment of early-life ID to ameliorate its chronic metabolic effects.

anemia, iron deficiency, iron supplementation, metabolism, metabolome, microbiome, microbiota, monkey
1613-4125
8
Mayneris-Perxachs, Jordi
921cd6b1-1c40-4cb6-9d70-9d3c4f479a78
Amaral, Wellington
756bcdc0-5e0a-420c-940b-3c310b9d4813
Lubach, Gabriele R
a2797858-5632-4f8c-a16f-5848f19aa96d
Lyte, Mark
a545b2bd-f1a3-4a06-95e5-80d7c46a18ed
Phillips, Gregory J
b202adff-bf23-42f6-8db3-740c89c4b486
Posma, Joram M
0e457117-0a4c-4e59-9a97-d09ec466d9e9
Coe, Christopher L
72252a13-48db-4693-ac46-fd9cbbb7ae06
Swann, Jonathan R
7c11a66b-f4b8-4dbf-aa17-ad8b0561b85c
Mayneris-Perxachs, Jordi
921cd6b1-1c40-4cb6-9d70-9d3c4f479a78
Amaral, Wellington
756bcdc0-5e0a-420c-940b-3c310b9d4813
Lubach, Gabriele R
a2797858-5632-4f8c-a16f-5848f19aa96d
Lyte, Mark
a545b2bd-f1a3-4a06-95e5-80d7c46a18ed
Phillips, Gregory J
b202adff-bf23-42f6-8db3-740c89c4b486
Posma, Joram M
0e457117-0a4c-4e59-9a97-d09ec466d9e9
Coe, Christopher L
72252a13-48db-4693-ac46-fd9cbbb7ae06
Swann, Jonathan R
7c11a66b-f4b8-4dbf-aa17-ad8b0561b85c

Mayneris-Perxachs, Jordi, Amaral, Wellington, Lubach, Gabriele R, Lyte, Mark, Phillips, Gregory J, Posma, Joram M, Coe, Christopher L and Swann, Jonathan R (2021) Gut microbial and metabolic profiling reveal the lingering effects of infantile iron deficiency unless treated with iron. Molecular Nutrition & Food Research, 65 (8), 8, [e2001018]. (doi:10.1002/mnfr.202001018).

Record type: Article

Abstract

SCOPE: Iron deficiency (ID) compromises the health of infants worldwide. Although readily treated with iron, concerns remain about the persistence of some effects. Metabolic and gut microbial consequences of infantile ID were investigated in juvenile monkeys after natural recovery (pID) from iron deficiency or post-treatment with iron dextran and B vitamins (pID+Fe).

METHODS AND RESULTS: Metabolomic profiling of urine and plasma is conducted with 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Gut microbiota are characterized from rectal swabs by amplicon sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Urinary metabolic profiles of pID monkeys significantly differed from pID+Fe and continuously iron-sufficient controls (IS) with higher maltose and lower amounts of microbial-derived metabolites. Persistent differences in energy metabolism are apparent from the plasma metabolic phenotypes with greater reliance on anaerobic glycolysis in pID monkeys. Microbial profiling indicated higher abundances of Methanobrevibacter, Lachnobacterium, and Ruminococcus in pID monkeys and any history of ID resulted in a lower Prevotella abundance compared to the IS controls.

CONCLUSIONS: Lingering metabolic and microbial effects are found after natural recovery from ID. These long-term biochemical derangements are not present in the pID+Fe animals emphasizing the importance of the early detection and treatment of early-life ID to ameliorate its chronic metabolic effects.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 29 January 2021
e-pub ahead of print date: 17 February 2021
Published date: 17 February 2021
Keywords: anemia, iron deficiency, iron supplementation, metabolism, metabolome, microbiome, microbiota, monkey

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 448387
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/448387
ISSN: 1613-4125
PURE UUID: 347a76b9-9e18-4ef1-82a2-88a5c67e7cc9
ORCID for Jonathan R Swann: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6485-4529

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 21 Apr 2021 16:32
Last modified: 14 May 2021 02:04

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Contributors

Author: Jordi Mayneris-Perxachs
Author: Wellington Amaral
Author: Gabriele R Lubach
Author: Mark Lyte
Author: Gregory J Phillips
Author: Joram M Posma
Author: Christopher L Coe

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