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Nausea and vomiting in early pregnancy: effects on food intake and diet quality

Nausea and vomiting in early pregnancy: effects on food intake and diet quality
Nausea and vomiting in early pregnancy: effects on food intake and diet quality
Experiences of nausea and/or vomiting in pregnancy (NVP) vary greatly, but the paucity of studies with pre-pregnancy dietary data mean that little is known about the effects of NVP on diet. Using an administered food frequency questionnaire, diet was assessed before pregnancy and at 11 and 34 weeks’ gestation in 2270 participants in a UK birth cohort study (Southampton Women’s Survey). Experience of NVP in early pregnancy was graded as none, mild, moderate or severe. Participants reported their level of food consumption as more, the same or less than before pregnancy. ‘Prudent’ diet scores (derived using principal component analysis) were used to describe participants’ diet quality before, in early and late pregnancy.
In early pregnancy, 89% of women were nauseous, although most commonly the NVP experienced was mild (48%) or moderate (30%); 11% had severe NVP. 39% of women reported an increase in their level of food intake in early pregnancy; 34% reported a reduction. Increasing severity of nausea was associated with changes in intake of a range of foods, most notably reduced consumption of vegetables, tea/coffee, rice/pasta, breakfast cereals, beans/pulses and citrus fruits/fruit juices and increased consumption of white bread, and soft drinks. Increasing severity of nausea was also associated with decreasing prudent diet score from before to early pregnancy, such that women with severe nausea had prudent diet scores 0.29 SDs lower than those with no nausea (P<0.001). However, this was transient as NVP was not related to change in diet quality from before to late pregnancy.
1740-8695
Crozier, Sarah
9c3595ce-45b0-44fa-8c4c-4c555e628a03
Inskip, Hazel
5fb4470a-9379-49b2-a533-9da8e61058b7
Godfrey, Keith
0931701e-fe2c-44b5-8f0d-ec5c7477a6fd
Cooper, Cyrus
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
Robinson, Sian
ba591c98-4380-456a-be8a-c452f992b69b
Crozier, Sarah
9c3595ce-45b0-44fa-8c4c-4c555e628a03
Inskip, Hazel
5fb4470a-9379-49b2-a533-9da8e61058b7
Godfrey, Keith
0931701e-fe2c-44b5-8f0d-ec5c7477a6fd
Cooper, Cyrus
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
Robinson, Sian
ba591c98-4380-456a-be8a-c452f992b69b

Crozier, Sarah, Inskip, Hazel, Godfrey, Keith, Cooper, Cyrus and Robinson, Sian (2017) Nausea and vomiting in early pregnancy: effects on food intake and diet quality. Maternal & Child Nutrition, 13 (4), [e12389]. (doi:10.1111/mcn.12389).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Experiences of nausea and/or vomiting in pregnancy (NVP) vary greatly, but the paucity of studies with pre-pregnancy dietary data mean that little is known about the effects of NVP on diet. Using an administered food frequency questionnaire, diet was assessed before pregnancy and at 11 and 34 weeks’ gestation in 2270 participants in a UK birth cohort study (Southampton Women’s Survey). Experience of NVP in early pregnancy was graded as none, mild, moderate or severe. Participants reported their level of food consumption as more, the same or less than before pregnancy. ‘Prudent’ diet scores (derived using principal component analysis) were used to describe participants’ diet quality before, in early and late pregnancy.
In early pregnancy, 89% of women were nauseous, although most commonly the NVP experienced was mild (48%) or moderate (30%); 11% had severe NVP. 39% of women reported an increase in their level of food intake in early pregnancy; 34% reported a reduction. Increasing severity of nausea was associated with changes in intake of a range of foods, most notably reduced consumption of vegetables, tea/coffee, rice/pasta, breakfast cereals, beans/pulses and citrus fruits/fruit juices and increased consumption of white bread, and soft drinks. Increasing severity of nausea was also associated with decreasing prudent diet score from before to early pregnancy, such that women with severe nausea had prudent diet scores 0.29 SDs lower than those with no nausea (P<0.001). However, this was transient as NVP was not related to change in diet quality from before to late pregnancy.

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Accepted/In Press date: 19 September 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 29 November 2016
Published date: October 2017
Organisations: Faculty of Medicine

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 401420
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/401420
ISSN: 1740-8695
PURE UUID: 206f706f-b1a4-4892-bd43-aebd83458ab6
ORCID for Sarah Crozier: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-9524-1127
ORCID for Hazel Inskip: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-8897-1749
ORCID for Keith Godfrey: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4643-0618
ORCID for Cyrus Cooper: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3510-0709
ORCID for Sian Robinson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1766-7269

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Date deposited: 17 Oct 2016 13:05
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 16:56

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