The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Risk of developing a second primary cancer in male breast cancer survivors: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Risk of developing a second primary cancer in male breast cancer survivors: a systematic review and meta-analysis
Risk of developing a second primary cancer in male breast cancer survivors: a systematic review and meta-analysis
Background: with increasing survival after cancer diagnosis, second primary cancers (SPCs) are becoming more prevalent. We investigated the incidence and site of non-breast SPC risks following male breast cancer (BC).

Methods: PubMed, Embase and Web of Science were systematically searched for studies reporting standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) for SPCs published by March 2022. Meta-analyses used the generic inverse-variance method, assuming a random-effects model. We evaluated SIRs for overall SPCs, site-specific risks, by age at BC onset, time since BC onset and geographic region. We assessed study quality using routine techniques.

Results: eight population-based retrospective cohort studies were identified. SIRs ranged from 1.05 to 2.17. The summary SIR estimate was 1.27 (95%CI: 1.03-1.56, I2: 86%) and there were increased colorectal (SIR: 1.29, 95%CI: 1.03-1.61), pancreatic (SIR: 1.64, 95%CI: 1.05-2.55) and thyroid (SIR: 5.58, 95%CI: 1.04-30.05) SPC risks. When an outlying study was excluded, the summary SIR for men diagnosed with BC before age 50 was 1.50 (95%CI: 1.21-1.85), significantly higher than men diagnosed at older ages (SIR: 1.14, 95%CI: 0.98-1.33).

Conclusions: male BC survivors are at elevated risks of developing second primary colorectal, pancreatic, and thyroid cancers. The estimates may assist their clinical management and guide decisions on genetic testing.
0007-0920
Allen, Isaac
6268ab30-a744-4c41-8ea5-51fdaf383a99
Hassan, Hend
f6df8c3f-7aca-4f59-9bce-87f557b0cbeb
Sofianopoulou, Eleni
58f9ab8c-87e5-4b7a-ad3b-4f85b89d2dad
Eccles, Diana
5b59bc73-11c9-4cf0-a9d5-7a8e523eee23
Turnbull, Clare
63408861-754b-4f55-a010-29d1bea914e2
Tischkowitz, Marc
1e7750c2-91a5-4079-a1f0-f59a1f42405b
Pharoah, Paul
64b86198-95c7-4b5d-81b1-169f57054cbd
Antoniou, Antonis C
e5c475a7-25bb-4973-b7aa-689c00c7edab
Allen, Isaac
6268ab30-a744-4c41-8ea5-51fdaf383a99
Hassan, Hend
f6df8c3f-7aca-4f59-9bce-87f557b0cbeb
Sofianopoulou, Eleni
58f9ab8c-87e5-4b7a-ad3b-4f85b89d2dad
Eccles, Diana
5b59bc73-11c9-4cf0-a9d5-7a8e523eee23
Turnbull, Clare
63408861-754b-4f55-a010-29d1bea914e2
Tischkowitz, Marc
1e7750c2-91a5-4079-a1f0-f59a1f42405b
Pharoah, Paul
64b86198-95c7-4b5d-81b1-169f57054cbd
Antoniou, Antonis C
e5c475a7-25bb-4973-b7aa-689c00c7edab

Allen, Isaac, Hassan, Hend, Sofianopoulou, Eleni, Eccles, Diana, Turnbull, Clare, Tischkowitz, Marc, Pharoah, Paul and Antoniou, Antonis C (2022) Risk of developing a second primary cancer in male breast cancer survivors: a systematic review and meta-analysis. British Journal of Cancer. (doi:10.1038/s41416-022-01940-1).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: with increasing survival after cancer diagnosis, second primary cancers (SPCs) are becoming more prevalent. We investigated the incidence and site of non-breast SPC risks following male breast cancer (BC).

Methods: PubMed, Embase and Web of Science were systematically searched for studies reporting standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) for SPCs published by March 2022. Meta-analyses used the generic inverse-variance method, assuming a random-effects model. We evaluated SIRs for overall SPCs, site-specific risks, by age at BC onset, time since BC onset and geographic region. We assessed study quality using routine techniques.

Results: eight population-based retrospective cohort studies were identified. SIRs ranged from 1.05 to 2.17. The summary SIR estimate was 1.27 (95%CI: 1.03-1.56, I2: 86%) and there were increased colorectal (SIR: 1.29, 95%CI: 1.03-1.61), pancreatic (SIR: 1.64, 95%CI: 1.05-2.55) and thyroid (SIR: 5.58, 95%CI: 1.04-30.05) SPC risks. When an outlying study was excluded, the summary SIR for men diagnosed with BC before age 50 was 1.50 (95%CI: 1.21-1.85), significantly higher than men diagnosed at older ages (SIR: 1.14, 95%CI: 0.98-1.33).

Conclusions: male BC survivors are at elevated risks of developing second primary colorectal, pancreatic, and thyroid cancers. The estimates may assist their clinical management and guide decisions on genetic testing.

Text
Main body - Accepted Manuscript
Download (1MB)
Text
Supplementary material - Accepted Manuscript
Download (150kB)
Text
Table 1 - Accepted Manuscript
Download (41kB)
Text
s41416-022-01940-1 - Version of Record
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.
Download (623kB)

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 25 July 2022
Published date: 17 September 2022
Additional Information: This study was undertaken as part of the CanGene-CanVar research project. The authors thank the associated researchers for their valuable input. MT was supported by the NIHR Cambridge Biomedical Research Centre (BRC-1215-20014).

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 470134
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/470134
ISSN: 0007-0920
PURE UUID: 310fa8e4-e4f0-4f3c-8bc1-f9acbee54b63
ORCID for Diana Eccles: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-9935-3169

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 04 Oct 2022 16:30
Last modified: 25 Jan 2023 05:01

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Isaac Allen
Author: Hend Hassan
Author: Eleni Sofianopoulou
Author: Diana Eccles ORCID iD
Author: Clare Turnbull
Author: Marc Tischkowitz
Author: Paul Pharoah
Author: Antonis C Antoniou

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×