The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

A randomized controlled trial assessing whether listening to music at time of embryo transfer effects anxiety levels

A randomized controlled trial assessing whether listening to music at time of embryo transfer effects anxiety levels
A randomized controlled trial assessing whether listening to music at time of embryo transfer effects anxiety levels
Background: Fertility treatment may have a negative emotional impact on women. Lower levels of anxiety have been associated with improved treatment success but there is no standardised method for addressing these needs. Music is a safe and beneficial non-pharmacological intervention in a number of medical fields. It may alter subjective and objective psychological anxiety as well as physiological functioning. However, little data exists surrounding the therapeutic use of music in fertility treatment but it may attenuate anxiety. Methods: An assessor-blinded parallel case control study in an IVF center, England UK. 42 women undergoing assisted reproductive treatment were recruited between February and December 2013. Women were randomised by random envelopes containing equal sized 'music' (listened to self-selected music during embryo transfer) or 'control' (no music) groups. Participants completed the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory prior to, and immediately following a post-treatment observation period. Primary outcome was change in anxiety level. Results: 32 of 42 women (76.2%) were less anxious following treatment (mean change in anxiety score 6.9 95%CI 4.2-9.6, P<0.01) without difference between the study group (7.1 95% CI 3.5-10.7) (P=0.46) and controls (6.7 95%CI 2.3-11.1). Clinical pregnancy rates (55.0%) did not differ between music and control groups (P=0.95). Conclusions: Listening to self-selected music 15 minutes before and after embryo transfer does not significantly impact on anxiety levels of women undergoing assisted conception treatment nor clinical pregnancy rates. Music therapy has not been shown to reduce anxiety at time of ET and the effects of interventions such as hypnosis, acupuncture, aromatherapy and other forms of relaxation therapy remain to be explored.
2161-0932
1-7
Stocker, Linden
6990b82e-4431-4e32-8250-309d61e1a01b
Hardingham, Katie
f1f5bd9a-6a08-4769-bad5-ea96145378bb
Cheong, Ying
4efbba2a-3036-4dce-82f1-8b4017952c83
Stocker, Linden
6990b82e-4431-4e32-8250-309d61e1a01b
Hardingham, Katie
f1f5bd9a-6a08-4769-bad5-ea96145378bb
Cheong, Ying
4efbba2a-3036-4dce-82f1-8b4017952c83

Stocker, Linden, Hardingham, Katie and Cheong, Ying (2016) A randomized controlled trial assessing whether listening to music at time of embryo transfer effects anxiety levels. Gynecology & Obstetrics, 6 (9), 1-7. (doi:10.4172/2161-0932.1000401).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: Fertility treatment may have a negative emotional impact on women. Lower levels of anxiety have been associated with improved treatment success but there is no standardised method for addressing these needs. Music is a safe and beneficial non-pharmacological intervention in a number of medical fields. It may alter subjective and objective psychological anxiety as well as physiological functioning. However, little data exists surrounding the therapeutic use of music in fertility treatment but it may attenuate anxiety. Methods: An assessor-blinded parallel case control study in an IVF center, England UK. 42 women undergoing assisted reproductive treatment were recruited between February and December 2013. Women were randomised by random envelopes containing equal sized 'music' (listened to self-selected music during embryo transfer) or 'control' (no music) groups. Participants completed the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory prior to, and immediately following a post-treatment observation period. Primary outcome was change in anxiety level. Results: 32 of 42 women (76.2%) were less anxious following treatment (mean change in anxiety score 6.9 95%CI 4.2-9.6, P<0.01) without difference between the study group (7.1 95% CI 3.5-10.7) (P=0.46) and controls (6.7 95%CI 2.3-11.1). Clinical pregnancy rates (55.0%) did not differ between music and control groups (P=0.95). Conclusions: Listening to self-selected music 15 minutes before and after embryo transfer does not significantly impact on anxiety levels of women undergoing assisted conception treatment nor clinical pregnancy rates. Music therapy has not been shown to reduce anxiety at time of ET and the effects of interventions such as hypnosis, acupuncture, aromatherapy and other forms of relaxation therapy remain to be explored.

Text
Music study Gynecology obstetrics 13.09.docx.pdf - Accepted Manuscript
Download (78kB)
Text
Table 1 (QoL).docx - Accepted Manuscript
Download (24kB)
Slideshow
Figure 1 (consort) minus legend.pptx - Accepted Manuscript
Download (68kB)
Slideshow
figure 2 minus legend BW .pptx - Accepted Manuscript
Download (66kB)
Slideshow
Figure 3 (trait anx) minus legend.pptx - Accepted Manuscript
Download (131kB)

Show all 5 downloads.

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 20 September 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 23 September 2016
Published date: 23 September 2016
Organisations: Centre for Human Development, Stem Cells and Regeneration, Institute of Developmental Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 400772
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/400772
ISSN: 2161-0932
PURE UUID: a97ccd51-2bfb-4c85-a8bf-55dc5dd9e1eb
ORCID for Ying Cheong: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-7687-4597

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 26 Sep 2016 14:17
Last modified: 12 Dec 2021 06:17

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Linden Stocker
Author: Katie Hardingham
Author: Ying Cheong ORCID iD

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×