The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

A study in biomimetics: nanometer-scale, high-efficiency, dielectric diffractive structures on the wings of butterflies and in the silicon chip factory

A study in biomimetics: nanometer-scale, high-efficiency, dielectric diffractive structures on the wings of butterflies and in the silicon chip factory
A study in biomimetics: nanometer-scale, high-efficiency, dielectric diffractive structures on the wings of butterflies and in the silicon chip factory
Nature is an invaluable source of inspiration for engineers, who draw upon the solutions evolved by species over millions of years, to design new devices or perfect existing ones. The process of transferring nature's designs into man-made devices is called biomimetics. This thesis reports on a biomimetic study in quantum optics. The microstructure found on the wings of a tropical butterfly holds the secret of its famous structural coloration. The intricate arrangement of low-index dielectric material achieves, in the short wavelength regime of the visible spectrum, an extremely high reflection with a very large angular spread of the back-scattered light and acts as a very efficient low-pass filter. Devices exhibiting these properties may be desirable for applications in a range of fields of optical engineering. An experimental investigation of the scattering of light was performed on the butterfly microstructure. This revealed a more complex phenomenology than previously thought. In order to carry out the measurements, a novel experimental method for the spectroscopical analysis of the scattering from nanostructures surfaces was developed. This method required the construction of an experimental setup involving supercontinuum generation by means of a photonic crystal fibre and alignment tools with submicron accuracy. To explain the optical phenomenology of the butter y microstructure, modelling techniques, which are at the forefront of research in the field of photonic crystals, were used. A theoretical investigation of the band structure of previously unreported crystal lattices occurring in the microstructure was carried out using the plane wave method. A novel numerical method was developed, which enabled computation of the diffraction efficiencies of two-dimensional periodic arrangements of low-index dielectrics. The theoretical investigation accounted correctly for the experimental results. Using common microelectronic processing techniques, two- and three dimensional photonic crystals were fabricated, which were inspired by the butterfly microstructure and which shared some of its optical properties.
Plattner, Luca
ad8960bd-96ae-4e4f-9db8-b0d0dbf10ed4
Plattner, Luca
ad8960bd-96ae-4e4f-9db8-b0d0dbf10ed4

Plattner, Luca (2003) A study in biomimetics: nanometer-scale, high-efficiency, dielectric diffractive structures on the wings of butterflies and in the silicon chip factory. University of Southampton, School of Electronics and Computer Science, Doctoral Thesis.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

Nature is an invaluable source of inspiration for engineers, who draw upon the solutions evolved by species over millions of years, to design new devices or perfect existing ones. The process of transferring nature's designs into man-made devices is called biomimetics. This thesis reports on a biomimetic study in quantum optics. The microstructure found on the wings of a tropical butterfly holds the secret of its famous structural coloration. The intricate arrangement of low-index dielectric material achieves, in the short wavelength regime of the visible spectrum, an extremely high reflection with a very large angular spread of the back-scattered light and acts as a very efficient low-pass filter. Devices exhibiting these properties may be desirable for applications in a range of fields of optical engineering. An experimental investigation of the scattering of light was performed on the butterfly microstructure. This revealed a more complex phenomenology than previously thought. In order to carry out the measurements, a novel experimental method for the spectroscopical analysis of the scattering from nanostructures surfaces was developed. This method required the construction of an experimental setup involving supercontinuum generation by means of a photonic crystal fibre and alignment tools with submicron accuracy. To explain the optical phenomenology of the butter y microstructure, modelling techniques, which are at the forefront of research in the field of photonic crystals, were used. A theoretical investigation of the band structure of previously unreported crystal lattices occurring in the microstructure was carried out using the plane wave method. A novel numerical method was developed, which enabled computation of the diffraction efficiencies of two-dimensional periodic arrangements of low-index dielectrics. The theoretical investigation accounted correctly for the experimental results. Using common microelectronic processing techniques, two- and three dimensional photonic crystals were fabricated, which were inspired by the butterfly microstructure and which shared some of its optical properties.

Text
Preface.pdf - Other
Download (20kB)
Text
Conclusion.pdf - Other
Download (31kB)
Text
Bibliography.pdf - Other
Download (59kB)
Text
Title.pdf - Other
Download (36kB)
Text
AppendixB.pdf - Other
Download (37kB)
Text
Chapter6.pdf - Other
Download (566kB)
Text
AppendixA.pdf - Other
Download (107kB)
Text
AppendixC.pdf - Other
Download (82kB)
Text
Chapter3.pdf - Other
Download (1MB)
Text
Lists.pdf - Other
Download (119kB)
Text
Chapter1.pdf - Other
Download (869kB)
Text
Abstract.pdf - Other
Download (36kB)
Text
Acknowledgements.pdf - Other
Download (29kB)
Text
Chapter5.pdf - Other
Download (1MB)
Text
AppendixD.pdf - Other
Download (309kB)
Text
TOC.pdf - Other
Download (41kB)
Text
Chapter2.pdf - Other
Download (776kB)
Text
Chapter4.pdf - Other
Download (2MB)
Text
index.html - Other
Download (2kB)

Show all 19 downloads.

More information

Published date: 2003
Organisations: University of Southampton, Nanoelectronics and Nanotechnology

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 260031
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/260031
PURE UUID: 1c40a20c-5cdc-43d9-89dd-6b9dbcbf1085

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 15 Oct 2004
Last modified: 29 Jan 2020 15:39

Export record

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×