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Which anthropometric measures best reflect neonatal adiposity?

Which anthropometric measures best reflect neonatal adiposity?
Which anthropometric measures best reflect neonatal adiposity?
Studying the determinants and the long-term consequences of fetal adipose accretion requires accurate assessment of neonatal body composition. In large epidemiological studies, in-depth body composition measurement methods are usually not feasible for cost and logistical reasons, and there is a need to identify anthropometric measures that adequately reflect neonatal adiposity. Methods In a multiethnic Asian mother-offspring cohort in Singapore, anthropometric measures (weight, length, abdominal circumference, skinfold thicknesses) were measured using standardized protocols in newborn infants, and anthropometric indices [weight/length, weight/length2 (body mass index, BMI), weight/length3 (ponderal index, PI)] derived. Neonatal total adiposity was measured using air displacement plethysmography (ADP) and abdominal adiposity using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Correlations of the anthropometric measures with ADP- and MRI-based adiposity were assessed using Pearson’s correlation coefficients (rp), including in subsamples stratified by sex and ethnicity. Results Study neonates (n =251) had a mean (SD) age of 10.2 (2.5) days. Correlations between ADP-based fat mass (ADPFM) and anthropometric measures were moderate (rp range: 0.44-0.67), with the strongest being with weight/length, weight, BMI and sum of skinfolds (rp =0.67, 0.66, 0.62, 0.62, respectively, all P <0.01). All anthropometric measures except skinfold thicknesses correlated more strongly with ADP-based fat free mass than ADPFM, indicating that skinfold measures may have more discriminative power in terms of neonatal total body adiposity. For MRI-based measures, weight and weight/length consistently showed strong positive correlations (rp ≥0.7) with abdominal adipose tissue compartments. These correlations were consistent in boys and girls, across different ethnic groups, and when conventional determinants of neonatal adiposity were adjusted for potential confounding. Abdominal circumference was not strongly associated with ADPFM or abdominal fat mass. Conclusions Simple anthropometric measures (weight and weight/length) correlated strongly with neonatal adiposity, with some evidence for greater discriminative power for skinfold measures. These simple measures could be of value in large epidemiological studies.
0307-0565
501-506
Chen, Ling-Wei
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Mya, Tint
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Fortier, Marielle
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Aris, Izzuddin M.
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Shek, Lynette Pei-Chi
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Tan, Kok Hian
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Chan, Shiao-Yng
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Gluckman, Peter D.
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Chong, Yap-Seng
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Godfrey, Keith
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Rajadurai, Victor Samuel
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Yap, Fabian
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Kramer, Michael S.
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Lee, Yung Seng
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Chen, Ling-Wei
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Mya, Tint
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Fortier, Marielle
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Aris, Izzuddin M.
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Shek, Lynette Pei-Chi
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Tan, Kok Hian
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Chan, Shiao-Yng
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Gluckman, Peter D.
e916630e-5ae2-437c-a1d1-8e24c0e05589
Chong, Yap-Seng
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Godfrey, Keith
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Rajadurai, Victor Samuel
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Yap, Fabian
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Kramer, Michael S.
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Lee, Yung Seng
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Chen, Ling-Wei, Mya, Tint, Fortier, Marielle, Aris, Izzuddin M., Shek, Lynette Pei-Chi, Tan, Kok Hian, Chan, Shiao-Yng, Gluckman, Peter D., Chong, Yap-Seng, Godfrey, Keith, Rajadurai, Victor Samuel, Yap, Fabian, Kramer, Michael S. and Lee, Yung Seng (2017) Which anthropometric measures best reflect neonatal adiposity? International Journal of Obesity, 42, 501-506. (doi:10.1038/ijo.2017.250).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Studying the determinants and the long-term consequences of fetal adipose accretion requires accurate assessment of neonatal body composition. In large epidemiological studies, in-depth body composition measurement methods are usually not feasible for cost and logistical reasons, and there is a need to identify anthropometric measures that adequately reflect neonatal adiposity. Methods In a multiethnic Asian mother-offspring cohort in Singapore, anthropometric measures (weight, length, abdominal circumference, skinfold thicknesses) were measured using standardized protocols in newborn infants, and anthropometric indices [weight/length, weight/length2 (body mass index, BMI), weight/length3 (ponderal index, PI)] derived. Neonatal total adiposity was measured using air displacement plethysmography (ADP) and abdominal adiposity using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Correlations of the anthropometric measures with ADP- and MRI-based adiposity were assessed using Pearson’s correlation coefficients (rp), including in subsamples stratified by sex and ethnicity. Results Study neonates (n =251) had a mean (SD) age of 10.2 (2.5) days. Correlations between ADP-based fat mass (ADPFM) and anthropometric measures were moderate (rp range: 0.44-0.67), with the strongest being with weight/length, weight, BMI and sum of skinfolds (rp =0.67, 0.66, 0.62, 0.62, respectively, all P <0.01). All anthropometric measures except skinfold thicknesses correlated more strongly with ADP-based fat free mass than ADPFM, indicating that skinfold measures may have more discriminative power in terms of neonatal total body adiposity. For MRI-based measures, weight and weight/length consistently showed strong positive correlations (rp ≥0.7) with abdominal adipose tissue compartments. These correlations were consistent in boys and girls, across different ethnic groups, and when conventional determinants of neonatal adiposity were adjusted for potential confounding. Abdominal circumference was not strongly associated with ADPFM or abdominal fat mass. Conclusions Simple anthropometric measures (weight and weight/length) correlated strongly with neonatal adiposity, with some evidence for greater discriminative power for skinfold measures. These simple measures could be of value in large epidemiological studies.

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Accepted/In Press date: 29 September 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 9 October 2017

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Local EPrints ID: 414499
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/414499
ISSN: 0307-0565
PURE UUID: 5e1ec61c-eec4-4890-9411-3b4db184acb4
ORCID for Keith Godfrey: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4643-0618

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Date deposited: 03 Oct 2017 16:31
Last modified: 17 Dec 2019 05:52

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Contributors

Author: Ling-Wei Chen
Author: Tint Mya
Author: Marielle Fortier
Author: Izzuddin M. Aris
Author: Lynette Pei-Chi Shek
Author: Kok Hian Tan
Author: Shiao-Yng Chan
Author: Peter D. Gluckman
Author: Yap-Seng Chong
Author: Keith Godfrey ORCID iD
Author: Victor Samuel Rajadurai
Author: Fabian Yap
Author: Michael S. Kramer
Author: Yung Seng Lee

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